If you’re experiencing dull pain, weakness, and limited range of motion in your shoulder, you may have a rotator cuff injury.

What Makes Up The Rotator Cuff?

The rotator cuff includes the muscles and tendons around the shoulder joint. These tissues can tear, especially if you have a job that requires a lot of overhead movement, or you play shoulder-heavy sports like tennis or baseball. If you require Rotator Cuff Surgery, our sports medicine physicians can help you regain full range of motion and shoulder strength.

What Types of Rotator Cuff Surgeries Are There?

Ortho ONE surgeons perform three types of Rotator Cuff Surgery:

  1. mini open supraspinatus tendon-to-bone insertion
  2. arthroscopic using a small camera and a series of small incisions
  3. mini open rotator cuff repair

With any type of Rotator Cuff Surgery, your surgeon will inspect the injury site, sometimes using a small camera called an arthroscope. The surgeon will clear or debride any loose fragments of tendon before suturing it to the bone.

Different Rotator Cuff Surgery Techniques

Each type of surgery involves a slightly different reattachment technique. For example, with mini open supraspinatus tendon-to-bone insertion, the surgeon creates a notch in the tendon and a series of small holes on the opposite site. This lets the surgeon pull the tendon tight and embed it deeply within the humerus bone for better healing and blood flow.

With mini open rotator cuff repair, the surgeon not only debrides the joint, but also smoothes a portion of the shoulder blade known as the acromion. Again, the tear is sutured and sometimes anchored to promote strong reattachment and healing.

Your doctor can explain each type of surgery in more detail, as well as determine which you need based on your injury. The goal of each of surgery, however, remains the same: to alleviate pain and inflammation, and return you (and your shoulder) to normal function.

Rotator Cuff Surgery Demonstration

Watch this Rotator Cuff Surgery video for a more detailed look at the procedures, as well as some helpful recovery tips:

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These lists are not inclusive of all conditions and procedures. In order to obtain a complete and accurate diagnosis, a physician should assess your individual situation. Following diagnosis, your physician will discuss appropriate treatment options with you – both surgical and non-surgical. Schedule an appointment with an Orthopedic ONE physician.